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Posted:
Aug 17, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: August 17, 2015

Why is it, in spite of the fact that teaching by pouring in, learning by passive absorption, are universally condemned, that they are still so entrenched in practice? That education is not an affair of “telling” and being told, but an active and constructive process, is a principle almost as generally violated in practice as conceded in theory.

John Dewey

 

Dewey, J. (2004). Democracy And Education New York, Dover Publications (originally published 1916) (page 38).

Posted:
Aug 10, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: August 10, 2015

To let go of control, for those who are used to having authoritarian power, or to claim personal power, for those who have learned to live subordinately, challenges our deepest expectations about security. Some decline the challenge.

Peggy Natiello

 

Natiello, P. (2001). The Person-Centred Approach: a passionate presence, Herefordshire, PCCS Books (page 70).

Posted:
Aug 3, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: August 3, 2015

The only freedom that deserves the name is that of pursuing our own good in our own way, so long as we do not deprive others of theirs or impede their efforts to obtain it.

J.S. Mill

 

Mill, J. S. (1859). On Liberty, London, Penguin Books (page 72)

Posted:
Jul 27, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: July 27, 2015

Smallness is a prerequisite for the climate and culture that we need to develop the habits of heart and mind essential to a democracy. Such a culture emerges from authentic relationships built on face-to-face conversations by people engaged in common work and common work standards.

Deborah Meier

 

Meier, D. W. (1996). The big benefits of smallness. Educational Leadership, 54, 12-15 (page 12).

Posted:
Jul 20, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: July 20, 2015

Philosophy matters profoundly, immediately and in an enduring way to policy in general and education policy in particular. Without it we are more likely to be ignorant or confused about what we are doing or intending and why; we are more likely to pursue problems that do not deserve our attention and/or attend too little to those that do; and we are likely to deny the possibility of wisdom and justice in favour of a purely technical and therefore pointless proficiency. In other words, without philosophy education policy is more likely to be muddled and inconsistent, overly concerned with the tangential or the trivial, and so tremendously busy with getting things done that the possibility of foolishness outweighs the likelihood of wisdom.

Michael Fielding

 

Fielding, M. (2000). Education policy and the challenge of living philosophy Journal of Education Policy, 15, 377-381 (page 377).

Posted:
Jul 13, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: July 13, 2015

No education is politically neutral.

bell hooks

 

hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to Trangress: Education as the Practice of Freedom, Oxon, Routledge (page 37).

Posted:
Jun 29, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: June 29, 2015

Many students find it difficult to identify with their school on any deep level. They feel that their views and interests are denied by the adults in the school community and that they have no part to play in how the school is run or how their learning experiences are organized.

Mary Tasker

Tasker, M., (2008), Human Scale Education: History, Values and Practice., Bristol: Human Scale Education (page 11).

Posted:
Jun 22, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: June 22, 2015

Inclusive education is first and foremost a political position; it offers an audacious challenge to the attachment of ascending and descending values to different people.

Roger Slee

 

Slee, R. (2011). The Irregular School: Exclusion, schooling and inclusive education, Oxon, Routledge (page 14).

 

Posted:
Jun 15, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: June 15, 2015

The pressure on schools to focus on measurements and comparisons of performance can obscure the emotional and interpersonal experience at the heart of teaching and learning. Teacher can become preoccupied by performing and content, which can inhibit their capacity to focus on the emotional experience of learning.

Heather Geddes

Geddes, H. (2006). Attachment in the Classroom, London, Worth Publishing Ltd (page 60).