Tag Archives: politics

Posted:
Oct 12, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: October 12, 2015

Inclusive schooling is concerned with the educational experiences and outcomes for all children. Since present forms of schooling routinely deny human rights and exclude students on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, disability, sexuality and class, inclusive education is a project of educational reconceptualization and radical reconstruction.

Roger Slee

Slee, R. (2001). Social justice and the changing directions in educational research: the case of inclusive education. International Journal of Inclusive Education 5, 167-177. (page 174)

Posted:
Jul 20, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: July 20, 2015

Philosophy matters profoundly, immediately and in an enduring way to policy in general and education policy in particular. Without it we are more likely to be ignorant or confused about what we are doing or intending and why; we are more likely to pursue problems that do not deserve our attention and/or attend too little to those that do; and we are likely to deny the possibility of wisdom and justice in favour of a purely technical and therefore pointless proficiency. In other words, without philosophy education policy is more likely to be muddled and inconsistent, overly concerned with the tangential or the trivial, and so tremendously busy with getting things done that the possibility of foolishness outweighs the likelihood of wisdom.

Michael Fielding

 

Fielding, M. (2000). Education policy and the challenge of living philosophy Journal of Education Policy, 15, 377-381 (page 377).

Posted:
Jul 13, 2015
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Quote of the week

Posted: July 13, 2015

No education is politically neutral.

bell hooks

 

hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to Trangress: Education as the Practice of Freedom, Oxon, Routledge (page 37).

Posted:
Jan 29, 2015
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Less than 100 days to go

Posted: January 29, 2015

The General Election in the UK is now less than 100 days away.

 I am bracing myself for the onslaught of education policies. Free Schools are bound to get a huge amount of attention. Ofsted will get hauled over the coals. The words ‘standards, ‘quality’, ‘competition’, ‘choice’ and ‘teaching unions’ will be over-used. And yet, are the general public really able to tell the difference between one party and another. Are the policies all starting to blend together? Do politicians argue over the issues that are of interest to most voters or just to a small group of educationalists? If you are a parent who cares about the education of your child, will you know who to vote for?

 Here are three ideas that I would like to see the politicians discussing during the election campaign:

  1. Why, when there is a warehouse-full of evidence that ability grouping in schools is hugely damaging, academically and socially, does it continue? Why do politicians of all political parties feel so confident that they should make ability grouping mandatory? What evidence do they have and why are they not publishing this?

  1. Why do none of the political parties advocate for the closing of private schools, or at the very least, the removal of charitable status from all of them? Most politicians argue for the importance of social mobility and the entitlement of all children to a high quality education, and yet they are content to support a private education system that means some parents can always choose to opt out.

  1. Why are all the parties obsessed with grades and academic achievement in traditional subjects rather than considering the development of the whole child? Would it be possible for a politician to argue for the importance of developing self-esteem, confidence, happiness and a pleasure in learning? Could we consider that creativity and play is as important as academic grades?

I will be watching with interest. If any of the parties, large or small, engage with any of these issues, I might even consider voting for them.